The Ungava Peninsula of Nunavik, Quebec, Canada, is bounded by Hudson Bay to the west, Hudson Strait to the north, and Ungava Bay to the east. 169-180. The Inuktitut word “Ungava” means far away. It is 3.44 km (2.14 mi) in diameter, and is estimated to be 1.4 ± 0.1 million years old (Pleistocene). It was hoped that these finds would yield information about climate change dating back to the last interglacial period 120,000 years ago. The Inuit call the area pingualuit, which means “pimple.” The crater and the surrounding area are now part of Canada's Pingualuit National Park, created on January 1, 2004. I then followed the Caniapiscau River north to Ungava Bay. The crater cannot be approached by car because of the rocky terrain. Rivière Charpentier, Lac Charpentier, Lac Minto and Rivière aux Feuilles, Leaf River Outfitters, Leaf Bay, Leaf River Estuary Lodge (closed), boat ride to Tasiujaq, hotel, road to Rivière Bérard, Lac Bérard (Finger Lake), float plane to Lac Pau and return. The Pingualuit Crater (French: Cratère des Pingualuit; from Inuit "pimple"),[2] formerly called the "Chubb Crater" and later the "New Quebec Crater" (French: Cratère du Nouveau-Québec), is a relatively young impact crater located on the Ungava Peninsula in the administrative region of Nord-du-Québec, in Quebec, Canada. Filled by a lake 250 metres (820 feet) deep, it is surrounded by many smaller circular lakes. An expedition led by James Boulger in 1986 collected a small rock sample[8] from the area surrounding the New Quebec Crater. Akpatok Island is largest of the many islands in Ungava Bay. The lake also holds some of the purest fresh water in the world, with a salinity level of less than 3 ppm (by comparison, the salinity level of the Great Lakes is 500 ppm). [7] Meen led a second expedition to the crater in 1954. When NASA’s Terra satellite passed over northern Quebec on November 25, 2012, winter snow and ice had transformed the pockmarked landscape of Ungava Peninsula into a seemingly endless expanse of white. This fact, coupled with the grandeur of the landscape, has been…, Quebec, eastern province of Canada. Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. Three years later Canadian geologist Richard A. F. Grieve listed New Quebec among the 130 known terrestrial impact craters. Ungava Crater (Ungavacrater) (Canada) Carte (Plan), Photos et la meteo. Black Friday Sale! a 40Ar-39Ar dating method of the impact melt rocks determined the age of the impact to be 1.4 million years. The crater is exposed to the surface. First recognized as an impact structure in 1950, the crater is 3.4 km (2.1 miles) in diameter and has a rim standing as much as 160 metres (525 feet) above ground level. I checked the weather report … Chubb hoped that the crater was that of an extinct volcano, in which case the area might contain diamond deposits similar to those of South Africa. A magnetometer survey did find a magnetic anomaly under the crater's northern rim, however, indicating that a large mass of metal-bearing material was buried below the surface. The lake also holds some of the purest fresh water in the world, with a salinity level of less than 3 ppm (by comparison, the salinity level of the Great Lakes is 500 ppm). The 267 m-deep (876 ft) Pingualuk Lake fills the hollow, and is one of the deepest lakes in North America. Notes on the Ungava Crater of Quebec, Canada. Professor Reinhard Pienitz of Laval University led a 2007 expedition to the crater which extracted sediment cores from the bottom of the lake, which were filled with fossil pollen, algae, and insect larvae. [3], Planetary and Space Science Centre University of New Brunswick Fredericton, "Peterography of Impactite from New Quebec Crater", Aerial Exploration of the Pingualuit (New Quebec) Structure, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pingualuit_crater&oldid=989487747, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 19 November 2020, at 07:44. Evidence on the nature of the Ungava Crater unobscured by glaciations , Meteoritics, vol. First recognized as an impact structure in 1950, the crater is 3.4 km (2.1 miles) in diameter and has a rim standing as much as 160 metres (525 feet) above ground level. Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree.... Ungava-Quebec Crater, northern Quebec province, Canada. Amguid crater is an impact crater located in a remote and inaccessible region of southwestern Algeria. [4], Once largely unknown to the outside world, the lake-filled crater had long been known to local Inuit, who knew it as the "Crystal Eye of Nunavik" for its clear water. Ungava Crater (Ungavacrater) est un cratère (s) (une soucoupe généralement circulaire ou une dépression en forme de bol causées par l'action volcanique explosive ou une météorite) et a la latitude de 61.2833 et la longitude de -73.6667. Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, v. 44, pp. Microfacies and microstructures of a 9 m long sediment core are presented to discuss the depositional environment of deformed glacigenic and postglacial sequences deposited in the deep basin of the lake. It is one of the most transparent lakes in the world, with a Secchi diskvisible more than 35 m (115 ft) deep. Bathymetric studies suggest that Ungava Bay may be the remnant of an impact crater (age unknown) approximately 225 km (140 mi) in diameter. The next day was to be my hop to the crater. The crater was formed by a meteorite impact 1.4 Ma, as estimated by 40Ar/39Ar dating of impact melt rocks. [9] Boulger returned to the area that summer, along with a research party led by M. A. Bouchard of the University of Montreal. 1 (pg. [11] They presented evidence of shock metamorphism, which is consistent with similar impact crater sites. Wilkes Land structure, Antarctica Winkler Crater, Kans. An analysis of these rocks also revealed planar deformation features as well as the composition of the meteorite itself. 228-229) Leonard, Frederick C. 1954. The Wolfe Creek meteorite crater is the second largest crater in the … Premium Membership is now 50% off! Despite Canada’s great size, it is one of the world’s most sparsely populated countries. However, Meen's knowledge of Canadian geology tentatively ruled out a volcanic origin. Meen subsequently made a brief trip by air to the crater with Chubb in 1950; it was on this trip that Meen proposed the name "Chubb Crater" for the circular feature and "Museum Lake" for the irregular body of water about 2 mi (3.2 km) north of the crater (now known as Laflamme Lake). Let us know if you have suggestions to improve this article (requires login). [3] The lake has no inlets or apparent outlets, so the water accumulates solely from rain and snow and is lost only through evaporation. In 1948, the Royal Canadian Air Force covered the same remote area as part of its program of photomapping Canada, though these photographs were not made publicly available until 1950. It extends for more than 5,000 miles (8,000 km) to within 500 miles (800 km) of both the North Pole and the Equator and has an east-west extent of 5,000 miles. An account of the discovery and exploration of the two mile crater on the barrens near Hudson Bay. 1951c. [1] The crater and the surrounding area are now part of Pingualuit National Park. The only species of fish in the crater lake is the Arctic char. World War II pilots often used the almost perfectly circular landmark as a navigational tool.[5]. The crater is exposed to the surface, rising 160 m (520 ft) above the surrounding tundra, and is 400 m (1,300 ft) deep. Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. Evidence on the nature of the Ungava Crater unobscured by glaciations. They travelled to the site in a PBY Catalina flying boat in July 1951, landing on nearby Museum Lake. Route description: James Bay Road, Trans Taiga Road to Air Saguenay base at Lac Pau, float plane to Lac Nedlouc. This article was most recently revised and updated by, https://www.britannica.com/place/Ungava-Quebec-Crater. “Pingualuit” is the Inuktitut term for skin blemishes caused by cold weather. Following his return, Meen organized a proper expedition with the cooperation of the National Geographic Society and the Royal Ontario Museum. Meen, V. Ben. That same year its name was changed to "Cratère du Nouveau-Quebec" ("New Quebec Crater") at the request of the Quebec Geographic Board. On June 20, 1943, a United States Army Air Force plane on a meteorological flight over the Ungava region of Quebec Province took a photograph that showed the wide crater rim rising up above the landscape. Canada, second largest country in the world in area (after Russia), occupying roughly the northern two-fifths of the continent of North America.